Spokane Naturopathic Medicine | Doctor Lindsay Donahue
July 23rd, 2017
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Heavy Metals and Neurological Diseases

Mercury1

Did you know that surprisingly little aluminum introduced into the body is required to do damage? The following study took place by Donald McLaughlin, M.D. Professor of Physiology and Medicine at the University of Toronto. A single injection of 100 nanomoles (1 billionth of a mole) of aluminum chloride into the brain of cats causing the cats to develop a dementia similar to Alzheimer’s disease. When the test was repeated, this time by injecting the aluminum chloride just below the skin surface on the cats abdomen, the same results were noted.

Heavy metals such as mercury, aluminum, cadmium, and lead are suspected in many neurological diseases. Herbicides and pesticides are considered by some to be a risk factor in development of Parkinson’s. Heavy metals worsen: Autism, ADHD, and Alzheimer’s disease.

Aluminum, when inhaled, consumed, ingested, absorbed through the skin or scalp, is metabolized in the body, moved through the blood and either excreted through bile and feces or absorbed into brain cells. This is good reason to avoid aluminum cookware and aluminum in personal hygiene products such as deodorant. Consider using an inexpensive, safe, non-toxic alternative like baking soda.

Having low mineral reserves in your body or eating a diet low in minerals increases the neurotoxicity of aluminum. Being low in: zinc, selenium, iron, magnesium, manganese, and copper worsen the effect. Having excessive intake/exposure to arsenic, cadmium, lead, manganese, iron, mercury, and additional toxic/heavy metals increase the neurotoxic effect of aluminum. Have a diet abundant in minerals. Whole foods such as: vegetables, some fruits, nuts, and beans are known for their high mineral content. Limit your consumption of fish, despite their heathy omega 3 oils many are contaminated with heavy metals such as mercury. Find a dentists who has other options other than the popular amalgam, which contains mercury.

Crapper, D.R.; Dalton, A.J. “Alterations in short-term retention, conditioned avoidance response acquisition and motivation following aluminum-induced neurofibrillary degeneration.” Physiology & Behavior, 10:925-933, 1973.